Search Results:

<< Viewing Record 316 of 1190 >>
View : Light Box | List View | Image List | Detailed
 


Maker(s):Lamb, Francis
Culture:English (fl.1665-1700)
Title:map: A Map of New England and New York
Date Made:1676
Type:Map
Materials:paper, ink, watercolor
Place Made:United Kingdom; England; London
Measurements:overall: 14 3/4 in x 19 3/4 in; 37.465 cm x 50.165 cm
Accession Number:  HD 2007.26
Credit Line:Hall and Kate Peterson Fund for Paintings, Prints, Drawings and Photographs
Museum Collection:  Historic Deerfield
2007-26t.jpg

Description:
Map titled "A Map of New England and New York / Sold by Tho: Basset in Fleet Stree, and Richard / Chiswell in St. Paul's Church Yard" and engraved by Francis Lamb (fl.1665-1700). When English cartographic publishers first began producing maps of their American colonies, they largely relied on Dutch sources. "A Map of New England and New York" anglicized many place names and introduced others, such as Boston, but its geographical content copied a map published by Jansson's of 1651 in Amsterdam. As the 17th century came to a close, English maps of the region began to incorporate original information based on exploration and surveys. Although often attributed to mapmaker and publisher John Speed (1582-1629), this map appeared many years after his death. In 1627, Speed compiled and published an atlas titled "Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World." Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell later acquired the plates for the atlas and reissued it in 1676 with a group of new maps of “His Majesty's Dominions Abroad” prepared by Francis Lamb. The map depicts the region from Penobscot Bay to the head of Chesapeake Bay. The map has four columns of text on verso: "The Description of New Netherlands, now called New-York" and "The Description of New England."

Label Text:
When English cartographic publishers first began producing maps of their American colonies, they largely relied on Dutch sources. "A Map of New England and New York" anglicized many place names and introduced others, such as Boston, but its geographical content copied a map done a quarter century earlier in Amsterdam. As the 17th century came to a close, English maps of the region began to incorporate original information based on exploration and surveys. Although often attributed to mapmaker and publisher John Speed (1582 -1629), this map appeared many years after his death. In 1627, Speed compiled and published an atlas titled "Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World." Thomas Bassett and Richard Chiswell later acquired the plates for the atlas and reissued it in 1676 with a group of new maps of “His Majesty's Dominions Abroad” prepared by Francis Lamb.

Link to share this object record:
https://museums.fivecolleges.edu/detail.php?t=objects&type=ext&id_number=HD+2007.26

Research on objects in the collections, including provenance, is ongoing and may be incomplete. If you have additional information or would like to learn more about a particular object, please email fc-museums-web@fivecolleges.edu.

11 Related Media Items

2007-26t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-10t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-9t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-8t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-7t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-6t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-5t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-4t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-3t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-2t.jpg
2007-26t.jpg
2007-26-detail-1t.jpg
<< Viewing Record 316 of 1190 >>