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[AC] Mead Art Museum at Amherst College; [HC] Hampshire College Art Gallery;
[HD] Historic Deerfield; [MH] Mount Holyoke College Art Museum; [MH SK] The Joseph Allen Skinner Museum at Mount Holyoke College; [SC] Smith College Museum of Art; [UM] University Museum of Contemporary Art at UMASS Amherst

 


Maker(s):Morris, Wright
Culture:American (1910-1998)
Title:Gano Grain Elevator, Western Kansas
Date Made:1940, printed 1980
Type:Photograph
Materials:gelatin silver print mounted on archival ragboard
Measurements:Mat: 17 in x 14 in; 43.2 cm x 35.6 cm; Sheet/Image: 9 1/2 in x 7 1/2 in; 24.1 cm x 19 cm
Accession Number:  AC 2013.01.1
Credit Line:Gift of Stephen Arkin (Class of 1963) in memory of Benjamin De Mott
2013-01-1.jpg

Description:
A black and white photograph of a white, four storied grain elevator with a gable roof. The building is in the center of the image and against a rural backdrop.

Label Text:
"Donaldson's hitch bar would have to go. So would the split elm and the horse trough full of marbles, the old chain swing. Mr. Cole said the horses would soon go too. Cement paving would wear their hooves to the bone, he said. Willie said, for what did horses have shoes? Mr. Cole spit and said some day the paving would go right out of town. It would go to the east first, and then it would go to the west. He said when Willie had kids he'd bet their kids would ride it for miles. And when their kids had kids they'd ride it clear to Omaha. Willie rolled up his sleeve and felt in the horse trough for marbles. What makes you think, Willie said, that I'm goin' in for kids?"

The Inhabitants, 1946

Tags:
agriculture; food; rural; architecture; realism; symmetry

Link to share this object record:
https://museums.fivecolleges.edu/detail.php?t=objects&type=ext&id_number=AC+2013.01.1

Research on objects in the collections, including provenance, is ongoing and may be incomplete. If you have additional information or would like to learn more about a particular object, please email fc-museums-web@fivecolleges.edu.

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