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Maker(s):Shonibare, Yinka
Culture:British (1962 - )
Title:Doll House
Date Made:2002
Type:Sculpture
Materials:mixed media
Place Made:United States
Measurements:house: 13 x 8 x 9 1/4 in.; 33.02 x 20.32 x 23.495 cm
Narrative Inscription:  unsigned undated, impressed blue "medallion" on proper left wall with: Peter Norton Family Christmas Project, Yinka Shonibare, artist, lives here
Accession Number:  SC 2002.26
Credit Line:Gift of Dr. and Mrs. James A. Muspratt, through the generosity of Regina Taylor and Peter Norton
Museum Collection:  Smith College Museum of Art
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Currently on view

Description:
gold brick Victorian row house, green front door recessed in oval entry on proper right, oval topped single window above it, large bay window first floor proper left with oval topped three-part window above it, small chimney on slate roof at proper left edge; both levels have "wood" floors and "wallpaper", gold and green diagonal pattern on first and blue-green and red floral pattern on second; first floor furniture consists of fireplace, highboy, upholstered wing chair with matching footstool, small oval side table, round table, two side chairs, bookcase, and small stem glass and bowl; second floor furniture consists of fireplace, canopy bed with bedding, corner washstand, metal framed photograph of interior with figures, metal framed reproduction of Fragonard "The Swing", side chair, wood framed wall mirror, three drawer bureau and washbowl with ewer

Label Text:
Doll House recreates the artist’s 1872 Victorian town house in the East End of London. It reflects the artist’s dual cultural identity as an artist with Nigerian roots who lives and works in England. Fabric features prominently in conveying the message of his work, which questions “Englishness” and “African-ness” as an artificial social construction. Furniture in the Doll House is upholstered with a specific kind of batik or “Dutch wax” textile that at first may be construed as “authentically” African, but is instead a kind of cultural hybrid. These fabrics were based on Indonesian printed batik designs that were manufactured in Holland and England and sold to the West African market.

Tags:
architecture; interiors

Link to share this object record:
https://museums.fivecolleges.edu/detail.php?t=objects&type=ext&id_number=SC+2002.26

Research on objects in the collections, including provenance, is ongoing and may be incomplete. If you have additional information or would like to learn more about a particular object, please email fc-museums-web@fivecolleges.edu.

8 Related Media Items

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