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[AC] Mead Art Museum at Amherst College; [HC] Hampshire College Art Gallery;
[HD] Historic Deerfield; [MH] Mount Holyoke College Art Museum; [MH SK] The Joseph Allen Skinner Museum at Mount Holyoke College; [SC] Smith College Museum of Art; [UM] University Museum of Contemporary Art at UMASS Amherst

 


Maker(s):Luti, Benedetto
Culture:Italian (1666 - 1724)
Title:Head of an Apostle
Date Made:1712
Type:Drawing
Materials:pastel on moderately textured grey antique laid paper, laid down on a heavier off white board, the top and bottom edges of the paper wrapped around the mount
Place Made:Italy; Rome
Measurements:sheet: 18 1/8 x 13 3/16 in.; 46.0375 x 33.4963 cm
Narrative Inscription:  signed and dated on original wood frame backing at upper center in pen and dark brown ink: Roma 1712 [underlined] / Benedetto Luti fece
Accession Number:  SC 1989:33
Credit Line:Purchased with the Beatrice Oenslager Chace, class of 1928, Fund
1989_33.jpg

Description:
head and shoulders of an older man with receding hair line and beard holding a book and looking toward the right

Label Text:
Label text for ARH 240 French and Italian Drawings Renaissance through Romanticism, written by Maddy Barker, class of 2015:

Benedetto Luti was famous for his work in pastel. His use of the medium can be traced back to 1703 and is considered among the earliest pastel paintings in Italy. This work is for a series of the twelve apostles. The identity of this figure is uncertain, but the presence of the open book makes it likely to be one of the four Evangelists: Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John. The viewer is drawn in by the careful attention to tactility of the hair and beard of the apostle. Luti mastered color to create volume and luminosity reminiscent of the art of Correggio.

Keywords/Tags:
man; religion; Christianity; literature

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